Frequently Asked Questions

Common Questions about IVF

The purpose of ICSI is to assist the fertilization process when a man’s sperm count is abnormal.  Whether it is because the number of motile sperm is very low or the morphology is excessively poor, the technique involves the delivery of a single sperm into a single egg.  Since 1991, when it was first described, it has revolutionized the treatment of male infertility.

Most clinics will recommend ICSI if there is a fear that poor fertilization may occur by traditional IVF where sperm are merely added to the egg culture dish.  Accordingly, efforts are made to assess sperm by function or morphology to help determine those most likely to require ICSI.  It is best to discuss this option with your clinic personnel prior to treatment.

Category: IVF

While PGD was first developed in 1990, its use is recently gaining widespread support due to improvements in molecular biological detection of genetic disease.  The main purpose of PGD is to help physicians select embryos unaffected by specific genetic diseases to transfer.  With assessment of embryo quality it has been a challenge to find the one embryo most likely to result in a healthy baby.  The principle parameters used to date in embryology labs are the morphology (appearance) and development of the embryo over the short time it resides in the lab.  PGD involves a biopsy of the early embryo to assess the genetic make-up of the cells removed.  This allows physicians to choose those embryos that do not have genetic abnormalities in hopes of optimizing the outcome of IVF.

Incredible improvements have been developed over the past five years that allow greater genetic assessment with better accuracy.  There are an increasing number of single-gene disorders, like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia that can be diagnosed in the embryo before implantation.  By not transferring the affected embryo, the disease state can be avoided in the child.

Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS) embryos can be screened to detect chromosomal abnormalities (wrong number of chromosomes) that may lead to miscarriages, an abnormal fetus, or abnormal embryos which do not implant.  By choosing the embryos with normal chromosomes, the hope is to improve the chance of having a healthy baby.  However, evidence so far has not shown that miscarriage rates or delivery rates are improved, though new technology may hold promise.

Category: IVF

The objective of infertility treatment should be the birth of a single, healthy child. Many of the treatment options presented to infertile couples, however, are associated with high risks of multiple gestation. Moreover, many couples view multiple gestation as desirable and are unaware of the risks they pose to both mother and babies. Couples should understand these potential risks before starting treatment.

The ability to limit the number of ebryos or eggs transferred is an effective approach to limit multiple pregnancies. The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) have published guidelines recommending an optimal number of embryos for transfer based on patient age, embryo quality, and other criteria.

Category: IVF

Hatching of the blastocyst is a critical component of the physiologic events culminating in implantation. Conversely, the failure to hatch may be one of the many factors limiting human reproductive efficiency. The clinical application of assisted hatching has been proposed as one approach toward the enhancement of implantation and pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization.

The assisted hatching procedure entails the creation of a gap in the outer area of the embryo called the zona. This is done either by drilling with an acid medium, by laser, or by using a piezomicromanipulator.

Success rates following the use of assisted hatching in different ART programs have varied considerably. Well-designed studies suggest that assisted hatching might be best used in patients over 38 years old or with multiple prior failed IVF cycles.

Category: IVF

Yes. IVF was introduced in the U.S. in 1981. Since 1985, when we began counting, through the end of 2006, almost 500,000 babies have been born as a result of reported Assisted Reproductive Technology procedures (IVF, GIFT, ZIFT, and combination procedures). IVF currently accounts for more than 99% of ART procedures.  The average live delivery rate for IVF in 2005 was 31.6 percent per retrieval.

Category: IVF

The average cost of an IVF cycle in the United States is $12,400.  Like other extremely delicate medical procedure, IVF involves highly trained professionals with sophisticated laboratories and equipment, and the cycle may need to be repeated to be successful.  While IVF and other assisted reproductive technologies are not inexpensive, they account of only three hundredths of one percent (0.03%) of U.S. health care costs.

Category: IVF

In infertile couples where women have blocked or absent fallopian tubes, or where men have low sperm counts, IVF offers a chance at parenthood of a “biologically related” child.

In IVF, eggs are surgically removed from the ovary and mixed with sperm outside the body in a Petri dish.  After about 40 hours, the eggs are examined to see if they have become fertilized by the sperm and are dividing into cells.  These fertilized eggs (embryos) are then placed in the women’s uterus, thus bypassing the fallopian tubes.

Category: IVF

Common Questions about Infertility

The purpose of ICSI is to assist the fertilization process when a man’s sperm count is abnormal.  Whether it is because the number of motile sperm is very low or the morphology is excessively poor, the technique involves the delivery of a single sperm into a single egg.  Since 1991, when it was first described, it has revolutionized the treatment of male infertility.

Most clinics will recommend ICSI if there is a fear that poor fertilization may occur by traditional IVF where sperm are merely added to the egg culture dish.  Accordingly, efforts are made to assess sperm by function or morphology to help determine those most likely to require ICSI.  It is best to discuss this option with your clinic personnel prior to treatment.

Category: IVF

While PGD was first developed in 1990, its use is recently gaining widespread support due to improvements in molecular biological detection of genetic disease.  The main purpose of PGD is to help physicians select embryos unaffected by specific genetic diseases to transfer.  With assessment of embryo quality it has been a challenge to find the one embryo most likely to result in a healthy baby.  The principle parameters used to date in embryology labs are the morphology (appearance) and development of the embryo over the short time it resides in the lab.  PGD involves a biopsy of the early embryo to assess the genetic make-up of the cells removed.  This allows physicians to choose those embryos that do not have genetic abnormalities in hopes of optimizing the outcome of IVF.

Incredible improvements have been developed over the past five years that allow greater genetic assessment with better accuracy.  There are an increasing number of single-gene disorders, like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia that can be diagnosed in the embryo before implantation.  By not transferring the affected embryo, the disease state can be avoided in the child.

Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS) embryos can be screened to detect chromosomal abnormalities (wrong number of chromosomes) that may lead to miscarriages, an abnormal fetus, or abnormal embryos which do not implant.  By choosing the embryos with normal chromosomes, the hope is to improve the chance of having a healthy baby.  However, evidence so far has not shown that miscarriage rates or delivery rates are improved, though new technology may hold promise.

Category: IVF

The objective of infertility treatment should be the birth of a single, healthy child. Many of the treatment options presented to infertile couples, however, are associated with high risks of multiple gestation. Moreover, many couples view multiple gestation as desirable and are unaware of the risks they pose to both mother and babies. Couples should understand these potential risks before starting treatment.

The ability to limit the number of ebryos or eggs transferred is an effective approach to limit multiple pregnancies. The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) have published guidelines recommending an optimal number of embryos for transfer based on patient age, embryo quality, and other criteria.

Category: IVF

Hatching of the blastocyst is a critical component of the physiologic events culminating in implantation. Conversely, the failure to hatch may be one of the many factors limiting human reproductive efficiency. The clinical application of assisted hatching has been proposed as one approach toward the enhancement of implantation and pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization.

The assisted hatching procedure entails the creation of a gap in the outer area of the embryo called the zona. This is done either by drilling with an acid medium, by laser, or by using a piezomicromanipulator.

Success rates following the use of assisted hatching in different ART programs have varied considerably. Well-designed studies suggest that assisted hatching might be best used in patients over 38 years old or with multiple prior failed IVF cycles.

Category: IVF

Yes. IVF was introduced in the U.S. in 1981. Since 1985, when we began counting, through the end of 2006, almost 500,000 babies have been born as a result of reported Assisted Reproductive Technology procedures (IVF, GIFT, ZIFT, and combination procedures). IVF currently accounts for more than 99% of ART procedures.  The average live delivery rate for IVF in 2005 was 31.6 percent per retrieval.

Category: IVF

The average cost of an IVF cycle in the United States is $12,400.  Like other extremely delicate medical procedure, IVF involves highly trained professionals with sophisticated laboratories and equipment, and the cycle may need to be repeated to be successful.  While IVF and other assisted reproductive technologies are not inexpensive, they account of only three hundredths of one percent (0.03%) of U.S. health care costs.

Category: IVF

In infertile couples where women have blocked or absent fallopian tubes, or where men have low sperm counts, IVF offers a chance at parenthood of a “biologically related” child.

In IVF, eggs are surgically removed from the ovary and mixed with sperm outside the body in a Petri dish.  After about 40 hours, the eggs are examined to see if they have become fertilized by the sperm and are dividing into cells.  These fertilized eggs (embryos) are then placed in the women’s uterus, thus bypassing the fallopian tubes.

Category: IVF

 

5 Comments
  1. I wanted to thank Dr. Gago for being so wonderful. Before seeing Dr. Gago, I did treatment at another location for over a year without any success. While I didn’t need to do any extensive treatments with Dr. Gago, I attribute my pregnancy with changing atmosphere to a more personal one vs. a very sterile setting. I recommend any to see Dr. Gago and her team, you will love her from day one. I always say Dr. Gago has a magic touch, at least with me she did.

    Adyson Lynn Lay was born 2/23/15 at 7 lbs 11 ozs(Yes a little late with pictures).

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    • Congratulations Melissa! Thank you for sharing! Do you mind if we post this on our “sucess stories” page?

  2. We just wanted to update on our success story.our boy turned 2 months old and we can’t thank Dr.Gago and her staff for giving us our wonderful & handsome boy ‘Vivaan Balyam’.
    Thank u again for everything from bottom of our hearts for making our dream come true
    [img]http://gagofertility.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/image-2.jpeg[/img]
    [img]http://gagofertility.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/image-3.jpeg[/img]

  3. My husband and I will be needing an egg donor as I have one failed IVF treatment due to poor egg quality. Please send info on pricing individually and the bundles that are offered. Thank you.

    • Hello Kaylene,

      We would be happy to talk to you more about pricing. Please call our office 810) 227 3232 to schedule a consultation.

      Thank You,
      Jenny

Gago Center for Fertility
Lansing Office

1515 Lake Lansing Road Suite F
Lansing, MI 48912
Phone: (810)227-3232
Fax: 810-227-3237
Google Maps Directions

Gago Center for Fertility
Ann Arbor Office

1000 East Stadium Blvd. Suite 3
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Phone: (810)227-3232
Fax: 810-227-3237
Google Maps Directions