Frequently Asked Questions

Common Questions about IVF

Couples are generally advised to seek medical help if they are unable to achieve pregnancy after a year of unprotected intercourse.  The doctor will conduct a physical examination of both partners to determine their general stat of health and to evaluate physical disorders that may be causing infertility.

If no cause can be determined at this point, more specific tests may be recommended.  For women, these include an analysis of blood work taken, pelvic ultrasound and Hysteroscopy/SIS.  For men, initial tests focus on semen analysis.

Category: Infertility

The most common male infertility factors include azoospermia (no sperm cells are produced) and oligospermia (few sperm cells are produced).  Sometime, sperm cells are malformed or they die before they can reach the egg.  In rare cases, infertility in men is caused by a genetic disease such as cystic fibrosis or a chromosomal abnormality.

The most common female infertility factor is an ovulation disorder.  Other causes of female infertility include blocked fallopian tubes, which can occur when a woman has had pelvic inflammatory disease or endometriosis.  Congenital anomalies (birth defects) involving structure of the uterus and uterine fibroids are associated with repeated miscarriages.

Category: Infertility

Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs one of the body’s most basic functions: the conception of children. Conception is a complicated process that depends on many factors: on the production of healthy sperm by the man and healthy eggs by the woman; unblocked fallopian tubes that allow the sperm to reach the egg; the sperm’s ability to fertility the egg when they meet; the ability of the fertilized egg (embryo) to become implanted in the woman’s uterus; and sufficient embryo quality.

Lastly, for the pregnancy to continue to full term, the embryo must be healthy and the woman’s hormonal environment adequate for its development.  When just one of these factors is impaired, infertility can result.

Category: Infertility

Common Questions about Infertility

Couples are generally advised to seek medical help if they are unable to achieve pregnancy after a year of unprotected intercourse.  The doctor will conduct a physical examination of both partners to determine their general stat of health and to evaluate physical disorders that may be causing infertility.

If no cause can be determined at this point, more specific tests may be recommended.  For women, these include an analysis of blood work taken, pelvic ultrasound and Hysteroscopy/SIS.  For men, initial tests focus on semen analysis.

Category: Infertility

The most common male infertility factors include azoospermia (no sperm cells are produced) and oligospermia (few sperm cells are produced).  Sometime, sperm cells are malformed or they die before they can reach the egg.  In rare cases, infertility in men is caused by a genetic disease such as cystic fibrosis or a chromosomal abnormality.

The most common female infertility factor is an ovulation disorder.  Other causes of female infertility include blocked fallopian tubes, which can occur when a woman has had pelvic inflammatory disease or endometriosis.  Congenital anomalies (birth defects) involving structure of the uterus and uterine fibroids are associated with repeated miscarriages.

Category: Infertility

Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs one of the body’s most basic functions: the conception of children. Conception is a complicated process that depends on many factors: on the production of healthy sperm by the man and healthy eggs by the woman; unblocked fallopian tubes that allow the sperm to reach the egg; the sperm’s ability to fertility the egg when they meet; the ability of the fertilized egg (embryo) to become implanted in the woman’s uterus; and sufficient embryo quality.

Lastly, for the pregnancy to continue to full term, the embryo must be healthy and the woman’s hormonal environment adequate for its development.  When just one of these factors is impaired, infertility can result.

Category: Infertility

 

5 Comments
  1. I wanted to thank Dr. Gago for being so wonderful. Before seeing Dr. Gago, I did treatment at another location for over a year without any success. While I didn’t need to do any extensive treatments with Dr. Gago, I attribute my pregnancy with changing atmosphere to a more personal one vs. a very sterile setting. I recommend any to see Dr. Gago and her team, you will love her from day one. I always say Dr. Gago has a magic touch, at least with me she did.

    Adyson Lynn Lay was born 2/23/15 at 7 lbs 11 ozs(Yes a little late with pictures).

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    • Congratulations Melissa! Thank you for sharing! Do you mind if we post this on our “sucess stories” page?

  2. We just wanted to update on our success story.our boy turned 2 months old and we can’t thank Dr.Gago and her staff for giving us our wonderful & handsome boy ‘Vivaan Balyam’.
    Thank u again for everything from bottom of our hearts for making our dream come true
    [img]http://gagofertility.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/image-2.jpeg[/img]
    [img]http://gagofertility.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/image-3.jpeg[/img]

  3. My husband and I will be needing an egg donor as I have one failed IVF treatment due to poor egg quality. Please send info on pricing individually and the bundles that are offered. Thank you.

    • Hello Kaylene,

      We would be happy to talk to you more about pricing. Please call our office 810) 227 3232 to schedule a consultation.

      Thank You,
      Jenny

Gago Center for Fertility
Lansing Office

1515 Lake Lansing Road Suite F
Lansing, MI 48912
Phone: (810)227-3232
Fax: 810-227-3237
Google Maps Directions

Gago Center for Fertility
Ann Arbor Office

1000 East Stadium Blvd. Suite 3
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Phone: (810)227-3232
Fax: 810-227-3237
Google Maps Directions